Stetson Summer Hats

As Stetson celebrate their 150th anniversary, we are dedicating our social media channels to saluting this marvellous brand on their milestone.

The Stetson Spring Summer’15 range is true to the brands own aesthetic of classic shapes with a rugged edge; harmonizing it’s Western heritage with the current fashion landscape. We have a great selection of their straw and raffia hats which are the perfect accessory for effortless and understated summer style.

See below the Lamesa Toyo, a light straw hat with folded ribbon. The Merton Fine Tripilla Palm (Malibu Traveller) is a heavier hat peppered with dark flecks of colour and a embossed leather band. The Marrero Raffia is a pork pie influenced shaped hat with cobalt and red ribbon. The Millis Raffia, a pork pie shape with two tone ribbon and a lighter raffia on the underside of the brim. Finally the Hatteras Stripe an eight-piece stripe baker style cap with the classic button on the top and aeroplane brooch detail on the left back.

FullSizeRender (9) FullSizeRender (7)FullSizeRender (10)FullSizeRender (11)

FullSizeRender (8)You can find these beautiful Stetsons, along with us at: 102 High St. Rye, E. Sussex, TN31 7JN// 01797 225261

 

Sticks & Stones

Sticks_and_stones

One of the newest additions to our shop is a leather accessories brand Sticks & Stones. They produce a range of intensely coloured leather handbags and purses, which are stylish and understated despite their bold colour. However their is more to our new favourite brand than just pretty accessories.

Sticks & Stones started as a young vintage leather brand in 70’s Amsterdam, being showcased at the infamous Waterlooplein market- a hive for emerging fashion and creatives. It wasn’t until the 1980’s-1990’s that Sticks & Stones unique brand identity and products began to form. Noticing a gap in the market for colourful leather goods Sticks & Stones became the first leather brand to produce collection consisting entirely of brightly coloured leathers.

Another reason why we love them so much is because of their responsible and concious manufacturing. All of the leathers used by Sticks & Stones are AZO-free and they only work with tanneries with strict compliance and environmental regulations (which complies with EU regulations). The metal frames used in the handbags and purses are from a high quality German based supplier who complies with the implementation of REACH. A quote from Sticks & Stones website details the companies philosophy beautifully and cements our admiration for them- “We engage in running our business with great sensitivity to the world around us.”

The Panama Hat

The Panama hat is a traditional brimmed straw hat of Ecuadorian origin. The hats are hand woven from Paja Toquilla, a palm-like plant which is indigenous to the coastal areas of Ecuador.

It is believed that the Panama was produced from as early as the 17th century, gaining notoriety from the 19th century onwards with miners from the California Gold Rush and the 26th American President Theodore Roosevelt often sporting one on trips through Isthmus of Panama and Panama Canal. The popularity of the hat was once again heightened in the early 20th century with the emergence of glamorous Hollywood. The movie stars donned Panama’s both on and off-screen, it became a fashion accessory of the elite and desirable. The popularity of the Panama in England however began in 1902 when King Edward VII requested one from his Bond Street Hatter and since has remained a classic and coveted summer style staple.

Today, the need for genuine Panama hats continues to provide livelihoods to these Ecuadorian craftsmen however the production is becoming strained due to the competing and ever-present Chinese hat producers.  The art of weaving the traditional Ecuadorian Toquilla Hat was added to UNESCO Intangible Cultural Heritage Lists in 2012. A programme which is directed at ensuring the protect of important intangible cultural heritages worldwide and raising societies awareness of their significance.

A group of women weave Panama Hats out of the Paja Toquilla plant in Ecuador

A group of women weave Panama Hats out of the Paja Toquilla plant in Ecuador