KuSan

KuSan

KuSan has long been an autumn winter style staple at Herald & Heart. This fun, ethical and Eco-conscious brand began in 2000, after falling in love with the striking and colourful styles of knitwear worn by the people of Nepal.

Starting by sourcing the finest wool from New Zealand and handcrafting their products in Nepal (their original inspiration for KuSan) they produce a fantastic high quality range of hats and accessories.

KuSan adheres to their own philosophy  by working in honest and ethical manners in all aspects of business. Particularly with the factory in Nepal and the community which surrounds it; KuSan contributes to a variety of community initiatives in the Kathmandu Valley. KuSan is an advocate in tackling its global footprint as well as philanthropy- by using sea shipping opposed to air freight and by giving an annual contribution to Carbon Footprint. The label gives its consumers the assurance that its products, the means by which they are produced and exported have a great respect for the people and the planet as a whole.

Just some reasons why we love KuSan other than their stand alone products!

Stetson Summer Hats

As Stetson celebrate their 150th anniversary, we are dedicating our social media channels to saluting this marvellous brand on their milestone.

The Stetson Spring Summer’15 range is true to the brands own aesthetic of classic shapes with a rugged edge; harmonizing it’s Western heritage with the current fashion landscape. We have a great selection of their straw and raffia hats which are the perfect accessory for effortless and understated summer style.

See below the Lamesa Toyo, a light straw hat with folded ribbon. The Merton Fine Tripilla Palm (Malibu Traveller) is a heavier hat peppered with dark flecks of colour and a embossed leather band. The Marrero Raffia is a pork pie influenced shaped hat with cobalt and red ribbon. The Millis Raffia, a pork pie shape with two tone ribbon and a lighter raffia on the underside of the brim. Finally the Hatteras Stripe an eight-piece stripe baker style cap with the classic button on the top and aeroplane brooch detail on the left back.

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FullSizeRender (8)You can find these beautiful Stetsons, along with us at: 102 High St. Rye, E. Sussex, TN31 7JN// 01797 225261

 

Start Spreading The News…

Herald & Heart has travelled over the Atlantic Ocean and touched down in New York City.

 We are in the Big Apple to explore future ventures for us and our hats but I fear we have said to much already about our top secret, foreseeable plans,  just rest assured the future looks bright, exciting and very hatty! As we can’t disclose to much about the purpose of our trip to New York I thought instead we should at the city and its fine backdrop it leant to many fashionable New Yorkers of glamorous era’s gone by…

Gordon Parks, 1950.

Gordon Parks, 1950.

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Gordon Parks, 1950.

All of the above images were taken in March 1950 by the infamous Gordon Parks. To find out more about him and his incredible life and works visit … http://www.gordonparksfoundation.org/

The Panama Hat

The Panama hat is a traditional brimmed straw hat of Ecuadorian origin. The hats are hand woven from Paja Toquilla, a palm-like plant which is indigenous to the coastal areas of Ecuador.

It is believed that the Panama was produced from as early as the 17th century, gaining notoriety from the 19th century onwards with miners from the California Gold Rush and the 26th American President Theodore Roosevelt often sporting one on trips through Isthmus of Panama and Panama Canal. The popularity of the hat was once again heightened in the early 20th century with the emergence of glamorous Hollywood. The movie stars donned Panama’s both on and off-screen, it became a fashion accessory of the elite and desirable. The popularity of the Panama in England however began in 1902 when King Edward VII requested one from his Bond Street Hatter and since has remained a classic and coveted summer style staple.

Today, the need for genuine Panama hats continues to provide livelihoods to these Ecuadorian craftsmen however the production is becoming strained due to the competing and ever-present Chinese hat producers.  The art of weaving the traditional Ecuadorian Toquilla Hat was added to UNESCO Intangible Cultural Heritage Lists in 2012. A programme which is directed at ensuring the protect of important intangible cultural heritages worldwide and raising societies awareness of their significance.

A group of women weave Panama Hats out of the Paja Toquilla plant in Ecuador

A group of women weave Panama Hats out of the Paja Toquilla plant in Ecuador